Posts tagged trick riding

Dream Horse Women Interview: Kansas Carradine on Trick Riding, Cavalia, and What’s Next

Riding on U-Tube

After attending the 2008 Equine Guided Education Association’s Big Sky Horse conference in Valley Ford, California, I received a mesmerizing U-tube posting (see below) from conference participant Kansas Carradine. The video begins with the athletic and graceful Kansas doing expert lasso-work which is deeply sensual. The video then moves into awe-inspiring trick riding for Cavalia, including “Roman” riding—where Kansas stands atop two horses at once, with one leg on each horse. The footage where she is wearing red and blue shot outside in Australia contrasts with the dreamy sequences onstage in Cavalia.

Lifelong Love Affair with Horses

In a phone interview from her home near Lake Tahoe in early February 2008, the young mother told me, “I can not remember a time before horses.” By age 4 she was riding and from 5-7 she did gymkhana and trail riding. From ages 7 to 11 she was jumping horses and riding English-style. She has been performing with horses since she was eleven.

Going off to Summer Camp—for 7 Years

When Kansas was 11 years old, she left her Hollywood home for the Riata two-week trick riding camp in Exeter, California. The first thing they did was ride horses in the river. When she returned home, she announced to her startled father that she was moving there permanently. Within a few weeks, Kansas was living and working at Riata’s boarding school, as one of the performing “Riata Ranch Cowboy Girls.” Riata’s owners became her surrogate parents in what was then the only trick riding school in the U.S. Kansas thrived on the stability that the boarding school offered. Kansas recalls the responsibility instilled through working hard taking care of the horses, practicing, and performing. Kansas and her parents credit Riata and the horses for helping her navigate successfully through difficult adolescent passages such as her parents’ divorce and substance abuse.

 

Cavalia

 

From 2005-2007, Kansas performed in Cavalia, the dream-like theater and multi-media sensation that evokes the mystical, magical, and transformational relationship between human and horse. Kansas describes Cavalia, “I had always dreamed of it, but it didn’t exist yet. I had tears in my eyes the first time I saw Cavalia—being in Cavalia was a dream come true. Cavalia touches everyone. It transports people to another time. It is timeless, wrapped up in fantasy, mythology, and the collective unconscious. Knights, Celtic mythology, bareback riding, little girls—it is all there.” The performance schedule could be grueling with 7 shows a week and 250 shows annually in different cities and countries.

 

Destiny

 

Kansas sees the hand of destiny in her work with Cavalia. While performing with Cavalia, Kansas met her future husband, artistic director Alain Gauthier. She credits fate for bringing her to Cavalia and to her new life as wife and mother. Kansas actually performed on horseback until she was four months pregnant. She and Alain left the tour from Brussels, Belgium when daughter Phoenix Rose (now two) was sixteen months old.

What’s Next

Now in her late twenties, Kansas shows the same courage and clarity about following her passion and taking the road less-traveled as an adult that she did as a pre-teen girl. She loves living in the beautiful Lake Tahoe area, and is a devoted mom to her daughter. There are, of course, horses in her life, including some Friesians (those magnificent horses that medieval knights rode), and she is learning dressage. A lasso act in Reno beckons, and she and her husband Alain are busy creating inspirational equine theater.

Kansas credits horses with lifelong learning. She recently began training with Ariana Strozzi, one of the founders of the Equine Guided Education Association, and is planning to get certificated in the program. Kansas credits the work with bringing her into even deeper relationship with the horses in her life. Kansas is also looking into working with horses and at-risk teens at a program near her home. For now, though, it is a deep pleasure to share horses with her two-year old and set down some roots. It is a safe bet that the coming years will include horses, learning, family, and of course following her passions.

Resources: 

U-Tube Performance: http://www.youtube.com/kansasanne 

Los Angeles Times article about Kansas: http://www.hughhart.com/stories_04/latimes_cavalia.htm 

Cavalia: www.cavalia.net 

Equine Guided Education Association: http://www.equineguidededucation.org/ 

Ariana Strozzi: http://www.leadershipandhorses.com/

  

 

Leave a comment »