Posts tagged flicka

Flicka: A Movie Review

Mary O’Hara’s famous 1941 novel My Friend Flicka was made into a popular 1943 film starring young Rodney McDowell. In the book and the original movie, the main character is a young boy learning life lessons on a Wyoming ranch through his love for Flicka, a beautiful sorrel mare. There was even a My Friend Flicka tv series that ran in the 1950’s.

 The Girls Have It

In 20th Century’s 2006 Flicka, Ken McLaughlin has morphed into Katy McLaughlin, a teen girl uninterested in schoolwork. On her first morning home from boarding school, Katy runs out to the stables and dashes on horseback off into the spectacular Wyoming landscape. A wild mustang mare saves the reckless girl from a mountain lion attack, thus setting up a conflict between Katy and her dad. The glum quarter horse breeder, played by country singer Tim McGraw, doesn’t want a mustang on his ranch. Economic woes, a headstrong daughter, and the undeniable love of Katy for the beautiful black Flicka create the main dramatic elements in the film. Katy overrides her father’s orders and gentles the wild black mustang.

 What Happened to Ken?

The 2006 film has gorgeous footage and is sure to be a favorite of preteen girls. But what happened to Ken in this re-make? The reissue of this classic tale with a sex-change in the main protagonist reflects an important aspect of culture in the Western world. More women own horses in the U.S. and Canada than men, and women are now dominating most of the equestrian sports with the exception of racing and polo. The original novel and film were made at a time when horses were still the domain of the boys and men. In the 1950’s horses lost their primary jobs in agriculture and warfare, and since that time girls and women have increasingly dominated the stable. In the film, it is Katy’s brother who is interested in leaving the ranch to go to college, and Katy who is drawn to the land, the horses and the ranch.

 Catch the Ending

While there are many who fuss over the differences between the original story/movie and the 2006 version, most seem to agree that the cinematography in the recent film is spectacular, as is the landscape. Some reviewers have found the story too saccharine and trite. Of special note, though, is the very ending of the film. With beautiful footage of horses and her parents as a backdrop, Katy, played by Alison Lohman speaks:

 “I believe there is a force in this world that lives beneath the surface. Something primitive and wild that awakens when you need an extra push just to survive. Like wildflowers that bloom after a fire turns the forest black. Most people are afraid of it and keep it buried deep inside themselves. But there will always be a few people who have the courage to love what is untamed inside us. One of those men is my father.”  The last scene in the movie shows the exhilarated Katy riding Flicka. As the camera catches the ecstatic look on her face, Katy says, “When we’re riding, all I feel is free.” 

Don’t Miss the Horse Girl Photos

As the credits roll, dozens of photographs of girls and horses reinforce the deep kinship so many girls have for their horses in a beautiful photo montage. When I saw Flicka in the theater, a young girl gasped as she saw her own picture on the screen. Promoters of the film had collected photos of girls and horses nationwide, and hers had been selected.

 Conclusion

The gender change of the main character shows an important cultural trend (as well as savvy marketing.) In the last five minutes, the filmmakers have evoked an important aspect in the psyche of horse girls. Indeed horse girls and horse women do seem to be able to hear that primitive and wild force that Katy describes. If horse love is an important developmental stage in girls’ emotional growth, as Diane Ackerman says in A Natural History of Love, Flicka certainly captures it ably. Katy’s love for the wild Flicka helps her take risks, demonstrate responsibility, and experience the heady taste of freedom. I personally enjoy movies with independent heroines that have upbeat endings, and the last five minutes is worth the price of the video rental.

Leave a comment »